Images of a Big Island

Posts tagged “boats

Skye Boatyard 2

Hi all,

It’s been a filthy couple of days outside due to a Tropical Low/cyclone which has been wandering around the Coral Sea for the last week, trying to decide whether it will cross the coast or not!

Recently I upgraded from Lightroom 3 to LR 5, so, while the weather has been wet & wild, I have been going back over some of my files to see what difference it makes. Without going into too much boring detail, the upgrade was well worth it with some new tools such as the Radial Filter  and a revamp of exsisting tools such as the Spot Removal giving you more options  for tweaking your images.

One tool I have been impressed with is the Highlight Slider which is brilliant for retaining detail in  skies which I was always struggling with especially when conditions were light o/cast skies. It is nearly like finding an extra two stops of dynamic range in your camera!

The Clarity slider has had a makeover as well and they seem to have put it on turbo so it needs to be used carefully unless you want mid-tone contrast to make your images look like they have a sandpaper texture applied.

I have previously posted about this Skye Boatyard, while having a look at some files I played with these two different viewpoints of the same scene.

Abandoned

Waiting

For me, they really bring back the bleak & forlorn weather & scenery of that day!


Skye Boatyard

My first night on Skye was spent at Kyleakin which is near the end of the Skye Bridge. I decided to go for a walk out to the ruins of Castle Moil and came across this boatyard which had seen better days. The lowering leaden sky and the cries of the gulls seemed to suit the melancholy look of this place so I spent the next half hour here. Never did make it out to the ruins!

Skye BoatyardCastle Moil is in the background, legend has it that it was built in the 15th century for a Norwegian princess called ‘Saucy Mary’ who would hang a chain across the narrow strait and charge a toll on boats trying to use the strait!

 


Pushing my Luck!

“Whitsunday Magic” pictured here is a bit of a jinx ship! She was bought out from Turkey and for a few years was one of the largest vessels in the Whitsunday charter fleet, (I was briefly one of her skippers) before mysteriously sinking at the wharf. After refloating she was sold to someone who had plans to turn it into a floating restaurant down on the Sunshine Coast. After basic repairs they set off, only to have engine trouble shortly after and decided to return to Airlie Beach where the boat sat on anchor for quite a while until earlier this year when  the remnants of TC Oswald created havoc along the Queensland Coast.

“Whitsunday Magic” was driven ashore along with many others and has stayed there since with the tide flowing in & out of her hull. I took advantage of the lowest tides of the year to walk out to her across the sand/mud flats & see if I could get some interesting images.

Beached

After this shot I waded out a bit for a different angle & that’s where it all went pear-shaped! While trying to extricate my sandal from the mud that I was slowly sinking into, I lost my balance, ended up on my knees and my 5D Mk II with 24mm TS-E came perilously close to going for a swim. Unfortunately they did get a bit of a light shower so the 5D is on it’s way  to hospital as I type this!

I guess it would have looked pretty funny to anyone who might have been watching, but at the time………………….


English Canals

Back in the days before trains and trucks much of Europe’s goods were transported by water. Holland,Belgium & France have extensive canal systems which are still used to transport materials to & from their North Sea ports today.

The U.K. also has an extensive canal system. Although it is not used so much for heavy transport today, it is still well utilised by canal boats that have been converted to live aboard mobile homes.

Oxford CanalThese are a couple of images taken at Newbold-on-Avon  through which the Oxford Canal runs.

Tunnel of LightThe local council put a series of lights in the Newbold Tunnel which runs for a quarter mile beneath farming land above. Unfortunately, a couple of different coloured lights were out at the time, but it still looks pretty cool!

It looks like a very relaxing way to see the English countryside to me!


Whitsunday Magic!

Ho hum,just another shitty day in paradise!

 

There are definitely worse places in the world to wake up!


Dinghy Wharf

When this image first appeared on my computer screen I was a little disappointed in it, slight movement of the pontoon during a 3s exposure had very slightly ruined it. But, that’s what you get for doing a long exposure on a platform that floats!

I decided to see what I could do with it anyway because the composition looked good and that dinghy in the foreground looked interesting.

Image

Not the best image I have ever shot but I have to admit it’s growing on me! What do you think?


West Coast Fishermen

These images show a couple of fishing settlements on Tasmania’s West Coast. Fishermen are a pretty independent breed and the cray fishermen are no exception. Operating along one of the wildest coastlines in the world they have adapted to their harsh environment.

The logistics of supplying fuel, bait, food as well as maintenance and getting their product to market would be hard enough in these remote communities.  Factor in the weather and the fact that there is no infrastructure like harbours, marinas and in some places grid electricity, means that they have to be a little creative with their solutions. In places like Coutta Rocks and Temma they have built themselves substantial slipways so that when the weather deteriorates as it often does, they can haul their vessels clear of the wild seas. In other places they use a tractor  and trailer with the longest tow bar you will ever see to to haul their vessels to safety.

Hopefully these  images give you an idea of their working environment.